Nestle launches “Incoa” bar chocolate with cocoa fruit pulp replacing sugar

“This is a big launch, we give it to all the customers who want it and don’t limit supplies,” Alexander von Maillot says.

In recent years, the world is growing cautious about health and trying to figure out alternatives for slow poison considered sugar which is an essential ingredient in daily lives. While Nestle bagged a great substitute in cocoa fruit pulp for sugar required in Chocolate.

Nestle is all set to launch its “Incoa” bar chocolate sweetened with cocoa fruit pulp. Using cocoa fruit pulp, which is normally waste, added to flavor products reduces sugar and cuts food waste while boosting the income of cocoa farmers who can “upcycle” their cocoa by selling both the pulp and the beans.

It sure win-win situation for health and environment enthusiasts.“This is a big launch, we give it to all the customers who want it and don’t limit supplies,” Alexander von Maillot, Nestle’s global head of confectionery, told to media this week.

The supermarkets in France and the Netherlands with other European markets will be the first ones to enjoy this chocolate favoring their taste buds.

Nestle is sourcing the raw material from cocoa farms in Brazil but also working with partners in West Africa to see if pulp production could work there. Von Maillot said cocoa farmers could boost their income by 20-40% if they also sold the pulp.

“If we can sell more than the beans to increase our income, that’s all we can ask for because beans alone are not enough to get us out of poverty,” said Lamine Keita, a cocoa farmer in Duekoue, Ivory Coast.

Jerome Koffi, who cultivates cocoa on four hectares of land in Soubre, also said he’d gladly sell more, but at the moment there was only demand for beans.

Fruit pulp doesn’t come cheap – Incoa bars on Dutch retailer Albert Heijn’s website cost about 50% more than other dark chocolates.